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Species: Vibrio spp.

Iodomethane

Mass-Spectra

Compound Details

Synonymous names
Iodomethylidyneradical
Monoiodomethane
iodornethane
Methyliodide
methyliodine
Methyljodide
Monoiodmethan
Iodocarbon
Iodometano
iodomethan
IODOMETHANE
Joodmethaan
Methyliodid
Methyljodid
INQOMBQAUSQDDS-UHFFFAOYSA-N
Iodmethan
RFDEYF@
Methyl iodide
Methyl iodine
Methyl-iodide
iodo methane
iodo-methane
metyl iodide
Metylu jodek
Monoioduro di metile
Jod-methan
1-iodomethane
CH3I
Iodure de methyle
meth-yl iodide
DAT010ZJSR
AC1L1MA9
AC1Q38HY
Iodometano [Italian]
Joodmethaan [Dutch]
Methyljodid [German]
Methyljodide [Dutch]
UNII-DAT010ZJSR
Methane, iodo-
NSC9366
UN2644
CCRIS 395
CTK2H8218
I0060
Metylu jodek [Polish]
Monoioduro di metile [Italian]
WLN: I1
ACT10179
CHEMBL115849
Jod-methan [German]
C18448
HSDB 1336
Iodure de methyle [French]
LTBB002606
RCRA waste number U138
BBL034228
DTXSID0024187
NSC 9366
NSC-9366
OR000922
OR228622
STL281179
UN 2644
CHEBI:39282
Halon 10001
AN-41969
ANW-56407
BP-11384
Iodomethane, 2M solution in tert-butyl methyl ether
LS-90046
SC-49382
MFCD00001073
TR-024159
AKOS009031541
I14-5819
Iodomethane, ampule of 100 mg
RCRA waste no. U138
FT-0628742
FT-0628743
74-88-4
I14-14230
Iodomethane, for synthesis, 99.0%
F2190-0170
InChI=1/CH3I/c1-2/h1H
Iodomethane, SAJ special grade, >=99.5%
Iodomethane, 99%, stabilized 50g
Iodomethane, SAJ first grade, >=93.0%
MCULE-1718786667
EINECS 200-819-5
Iodomethane, contains copper as stabilizer, ReagentPlus(R), 99%
147937-07-3
Methyl iodide [UN2644] [Poison]
METHYL, IODO-(6CI,8CI,9CI)
MolPort-000-156-457
Iodomethane, purum, >=99.0% (GC)
Iodomethane, contains copper as stabilizer, ReagentPlus(R), 99.5%
Iodomethane solution, 2.0 M in tert-butyl methyl ether, contains copper as stabilizer
Methyl iodide [UN2644] [Poison]
Iodomethane, puriss., redist., >=99.5% (GC)
Iodomethane solution, certified reference material, 2000 mug/mL in methanol: water (4:1)
Iodomethane, 2000 mug/mL in methanol: water (4:1), analytical standard
IUPAC nameiodomethane
SMILESCI
InchiInChI=1S/CH3I/c1-2/h1H3
FormulaCH3I
PubChem ID6328
Molweight141.939
LogP1.56
Atoms5
Bonds4
H-bond Acceptor0
H-bond Donor0
Chemical ClassificationIodides halogenated compounds

mVOC Specific Details

Volatilization
The Henry's Law constant for methyl iodide is 0.00526 atm-cu m/mole at 25 deg C(1). This Henry's Law constant indicates that methyl iodide should volatilize from water surfaces(2). Based on this Henry's Law constant, the volatilization half-life from a model river (1 m deep, flowing 1 m/sec, wind velocity of 3 m/sec)(2) is estimated as 1.3 hours(SRC). The volatilization half-life from a model lake (1 m deep, flowing 0.05 m/sec, wind velocity of 0.5 m/sec)(2) is estimated as 4.8 days(SRC). The Henry's Law constant in seawater of salinity 30.4 g dissolved inorganic matter/kg seawater was 0.00354 atm-cu m/mole at 20 deg C(4) indicating a lower volatization rate for methyl iodide in seawater(SRC). Dissipation of methyl iodide from open surface water was found to be primarily a result of volatilization(4). Experiments conducted under indoor conditions resulted in a first-order half-life of 29 hours under static conditions and 6.5 hours when stirred at low speed with a magnetic stirrer(5). After 6 days, less that 1% of the methyl iodide was detected as iodide ion. Methyl iodide's Henry's Law constant(1) indicates that volatilization from moist soil surfaces may occur(SRC). Methyl iodide is expected to volatilize from dry soil surfaces(SRC) based upon a vapor pressure of 405 mm Hg at 25 deg C(3).
Literature: (1) Hunter-Smith RJ et al; Tellus Ser B B35: 170-6 (1983) (2) Lyman WJ et al; Handbook of Chemical Property Estimation Methods. Washington, DC: Amer Chem Soc pp. 15-1 to 15-29 (1990) (3) Boublik T et al; The Vapor Pressures of Pure Substances Amsterdam: Elsevier p. 51 (1984) (4) Moore RM et al; Chemosphere 30: 183- 91 (1995) (5) Gan J, Yates SR; J Agric Food Chem 44: 4001-8 (1996)
Literature: #Experiments were conducted to assess the volatilization loss of methyl iodide, applied at 30 cm, from 60-cm packed soil columns with different soils and under various soil surface conditions(1). In Greenfield sandy loam, the greatest cumulative loss occurred in nontarp applications, 94%, and the least in a high-barrier plastic tarp treatment, 75%. Volatilization losses with a polyethylene film was 90% and therefore this treatment was ineffective at preventing volatilization loss. Volatilization losses using a polyethylene film were significantly lower, 38% and 53%, from two soils high in organic matter and capable of rapidly degrading the chemical.
Literature: (1) Gan J et al; J Environ Qual 26: 1107-15 (1997)
Soil Adsorption
Using a structure estimation method based on molecular connectivity indices(1), the Koc for methyl iodide can be estimated to be 14(SRC). According to a classification scheme(2), this estimated Koc value suggests that methyl iodide should have very high mobility in soil. The soil/water distribution coefficient of methyl iodide in various soils were (soil, Kd): Greenfield sandy loam, 0.09; Linne clay loam, 0.15; Carsetas loamy sand, 0.16; and potting mix, 0.55(3).
Literature: (1) Meylan WM et al; Environ Sci Technol 26: 1560-67 (1992) (2) Swann RL et al; Res Rev 85: 17-28 (1983) (3) Gan J, Yates SR; J Agric Food Chem 44: 4001-8 (1996) (4) Gan J et al; J Environ Qual 26: 1107-15 (1997)
Vapor Pressure
PressureReference
4.05X10+2 mm Hg @ 25 deg CBoublik, T., Fried, V., and Hala, E., The Vapour Pressures of Pure Substances. Second Revised Edition. Amsterdam: Elsevier, 1984., p. 51

Microorganisms emitting the compound
KingdomSpeciesBiological FunctionOrigin/HabitatReference
BacteriaPaenibacillus Polymyxa E681n/aLee et al., 2012
BacteriaAlteromonas Spp.n/aSchulz and Dickschat, 2007
BacteriaDeleya Spp.n/aSchulz and Dickschat, 2007
BacteriaMethanobacterium Sp.n/aSchulz and Dickschat, 2007
BacteriaMyxobacterium Spp.n/aSchulz and Dickschat, 2007
BacteriaPhotobacterium Spp.n/aSchulz and Dickschat, 2007
BacteriaPlantibacter Spp.n/aSchulz and Dickschat, 2007
BacteriaPseudoalteromonas Spp.n/aSchulz and Dickschat, 2007
BacteriaPseudomonas Sp.n/aSchulz and Dickschat, 2007
BacteriaRhizobium Ssp.n/aSchulz and Dickschat, 2007
BacteriaRhodococcus Spp.n/aSchulz and Dickschat, 2007
BacteriaRoseovarius Spp.n/aSchulz and Dickschat, 2007
BacteriaShewanella Spp.n/aSchulz and Dickschat, 2007
BacteriaSphingomonas Spp.n/aSchulz and Dickschat, 2007
BacteriaVariovorax Spp.n/aSchulz and Dickschat, 2007
BacteriaVibrio Spp.n/aSchulz and Dickschat, 2007
BacteriaZoogloea Ssp.n/aSchulz and Dickschat, 2007
Method
KingdomSpeciesGrowth MediumApplied MethodVerification
BacteriaPaenibacillus Polymyxa E681Tryptic soy agarSPME coupled with GC-MS
BacteriaAlteromonas Spp.n/an/a
BacteriaDeleya Spp.n/an/a
BacteriaMethanobacterium Sp.n/an/a
BacteriaMyxobacterium Spp.n/an/a
BacteriaPhotobacterium Spp.n/an/a
BacteriaPlantibacter Spp.n/an/a
BacteriaPseudoalteromonas Spp.n/an/a
BacteriaPseudomonas Sp.n/an/a
BacteriaRhizobium Ssp.n/an/a
BacteriaRhodococcus Spp.n/an/a
BacteriaRoseovarius Spp.n/an/a
BacteriaShewanella Spp.n/an/a
BacteriaSphingomonas Spp.n/an/a
BacteriaVariovorax Spp.n/an/a
BacteriaVibrio Spp.n/an/a
BacteriaZoogloea Ssp.n/an/a